Event Date:
Feb 09, 2007
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 3:26.

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Event Date:
Apr 27, 2007
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 3:45.

Event Date:
Feb 13, 2015
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Health risks associated with air pollution uptake while bicycling are often cited as a potential drawback to increased bicycling in cities. This seminar will provide an overview of how roadway and travel characteristics impact bicyclists' uptake of traffic-related air pollution. Specific considerations for planners and designers of urban transportation systems to mitigate risks for travelers will be discussed. In addition, the extent to which bicyclists themselves can unilaterally reduce their pollution uptake will be described. This seminar synthesizes findings from a recently completed doctoral dissertation at Portland State University and from the broader literature.

Alex Bigazzi recently completed his Ph.D. in the Department of Civil and Environmental...

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Event Date:
Mar 07, 2008
Content Type: Professional Development Event

Lewison Lem, Principal Consultant of Parsons Brinckerhoff, on reducing the climate impact of the transportation system.

View paper: Transportation Strategies to Mitigate Climate Change

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The video begins at 1:49.

Event Date:
Jul 10, 2009
Content Type: Professional Development Event

ITS Lab (Engineeering 315)

Abstract: Despite the never-ending cascade of depressing economic developments recently, there are some encouraging new trends to be discovered. Some of these trends relate to the vehicles we buy and how we drive them, and the consequences of these actions. In this presentation, I will discuss several new findings about the positive influences of the recent economic changes on (1) the fuel efficiency of purchased new vehicles, (2) the amount and type of driving that we do, (3) how much carbon dioxide emissions we produce from driving, and (4) the number of road fatalities.

Bio: Dr. Michael Sivak is a Research Professor and the Head of the Human Factors Division of the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI). He received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from the University of Michigan. Dr. Sivak's primary expertise is in perceptual and cognitive aspects of driving. Examples of his recent research topics include human-factors aspects of vehicle design, bounded rationality and driver behavior, and the relative risks of flying and driving. In 2001, he was named a Distinguished Research Scientist by the University of Michigan. In 2006, he received the A.R. Lauer Award from the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society for outstanding contributions to human aspects of the broad area of safety.

Event Date:
Jan 22, 2010
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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The video begins at 5:58.

Abstract: An overview will be presented on key policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in our transportation system, and the health outcomes tied with those policies. The results come from the first-ever, formal Health Impact Assessment done on a climate change policy, coordinated by Upstream Public Health, and conducted by Oregon Health Science University and Human Impact Partners. Key health impacts related to changes in air pollution, physical activity and collisions will be presented for each of the 11 policies related to reduced driving. A new, ground-breaking study will also be presented on scenario planning that was conducted in London and New Delhi, that could be a model for how scenario planning can be conducted in Oregon.

Event Date:
Mar 05, 2010
Content Type: Professional Development Event

No archived materials are available for this presentation.

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Event Date:
Apr 16, 2010
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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The video begins at 2:46.

Promising Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Strategies for the Transportation Sector: Low Carbon Fuels, Leveraging Transit with Smart Growth, and Ports and Goods Movement Opportunities

Event Date:
Jun 03, 2011
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 1:49.

Abstract: Policy-makers, researchers, and activists often assume that traffic congestion mitigation results in reduced motor vehicle emissions without proper justification or quantification. This research investigates under which conditions that assumption is valid by comparing trade-offs between increased efficiency and induced travel. Analyses include investigation of varying vehicle fleets - including advanced-drivetrain vehicles. Results demonstrate that higher levels of congestion do not necessarily increase emissions, nor will congestion mitigation inevitably reduce emissions. These results apply for both roadway capacity expansions and traffic flow improvement projects. We compare the emissions effects of various congestion and emissions mitigation strategies, with particular attention to the roll of trucks and the potential of truck-only facilities. Congestion performance measures are also compared for applicability to emissions trends.

Event Date:
Oct 14, 2011
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 2:55.

With the advent of the alternative fuels, it’s very appropriate that gasoline is based on fossil fuels and becoming ancient history. As the gas tax becomes less and less pertinent to adequately funding infrastructure, electronic cashless non-stop tolling options are a more viable solution to financing new projects and providing mobility to existing infrastructure. There are a number of technologies being evaluated for the future; including global position systems (GPS), existing proprietary radio frequency (RF) systems, open standard dedicated open standard dedicated short range communications (DSRC) systems, or the existing cellular networks are also being considered. This presentation will focus on what technologies are available and what emerging technologies are the most likely to emerge as an effective and affordable approach to funding user fees and infrastructure needs. This presentation will also describe how user fees and tolling systems can help the environment, reduce congestion, and provide effective cashless transportation systems based on equitable user fees.

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