Event Date:
Feb 01, 2018
Content Type: Events

Join us for the 2018 TRB Aftershock event, sponsored by the Portland Chapter of Young Professionals in Transportation (YPT) and Portland State University's transportation student group, Students in Transportation Engineering and Planning (STEP)!

Each January, Portland State graduate students travel to Washington, D.C., to present their research in front of a national audience at the annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board. The aftershock gathering, a PSU tradition, is a chance for fellow students to see the research they presented and hear about the conference.

Refreshments will be provided, and student TRB posters will be on display.

RSVP HERE

Tags
trb
ypt
Event Date:
Feb 02, 2018
Content Type: Events

*NEW* LOCATION: Karl Miller Center at PSU, 631 SW Harrison St., Room 465
*NEW* REGISTRATION: Sign up through GoToWebinar

Portland State University students will share the work they presented at the annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) 2018:

TRAVIS GLICK
Evaluation of Route Changes Utilizing High-Resolution GPS Bus Transit Data
Congestion and travel delay on urban roadways can influence operating costs and service attractiveness. This research uses high resolution bus data to examine sources of delay on urban arterials. A set of tools was created to help visualize trends in bus behavior and movement; this allowed larger traffic trends to be visualized along urban corridors and urban streets. By using buses as probes and examining aggregated bus behavior, contoured speed plots can be used to understand the behavior of roadways outside the zone of influence of bus stops. Speed plots can be utilized to discover trends and travel patterns with only a few days’ worth of data. Congestion and speed variation can be viewed by time of day and plots can help indicate...

Read more
Event Date:
Jan 08, 2018
Content Type: Events

7:00 PM – 10:30 PM EST

The National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC) and TransitCenter invites you to join us for our annual reception at the 97th Annual TRB Meeting for a night of networking, fun, and bingo made especially for you transportation wonks.

And this time, we've bought out the whole bar (Fado Irish Pub)!

We'll be running networking bingo (transportation style*), and handing out big and small prizes - provided by our research consortium of six universities (Portland State University, University of Oregon, Oregon Institute of Technology, University of Utah and new partners University of Arizona and University of Texas at Arlington), TransitCenter, and PeopleForBikes.

Please RSVP so that we can plan for your attendance and email you a reminder. Complimentary appetizers (at limited capacity) will be provided.


 

*You might be wondering, "What does 'transportation style' mean?"
It means you'll be charged with finding someone who:

*Has been yelled at during a public meeting...

Read more
Tags
trb
Event Date:
Jan 26, 2018
Content Type: Events

*NEW* LOCATION: Karl Miller Center at PSU, 631 SW Harrison St., Room 465
*NEW* REGISTRATION: Sign up through GoToWebinar

Portland State University students will share the work they presented at the annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) 2018:

KELLY RODGERS
Defining Place: A Review of How Place Type Is Measured and Constructed
Researchers have been parsing which components of the built environment contribute to outcomes of interest and to what degree, particularly the effects on vehicle use and walking. Increasingly, researchers and practitioners recognize that the type of neighborhood may affect individual travel behaviors. Neighborhoods reflect a bundle of various land use and transportation system characteristics. These contexts can be constructed as different neighborhood or place types. But not all place types are constructed with the same use, purpose, or methods. This paper reviews three classifications of place typologies—urban design, data-driven, and area/development-based—to better understand their purpose and appropriate application to research, policy, and practice. 

JAIME ORREGO
Density Differences:...

Read more
Event Date:
Jan 19, 2018
Content Type: Events

*NEW* LOCATION: Karl Miller Center at PSU, 631 SW Harrison St., Room 465
*NEW* REGISTRATION: Sign up through GoToWebinar

Portland State University students will share the work they presented at the annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) 2018:

HUAJIE YANG
Regional Strategic Planning Model and Development of a Multimodal Travel Demand Module
Integrated land use and transportation models have evolved along a spectrum with simplistic sketch planning models on one end and sophisticated microsimulation models on the other. While each type of these models has its niche, they are largely unable to balance the flexibility and realism of microsimulation and the speed and interactiveness of simple models. The Regional Strategic Planning Model (RSPM) aims to fill this gap by taking a microsimulation approach but making other simplifications, to model first order long-term outcomes of land use and transportation quickly. In this paper, we introduce the RSPM framework. We discuss our choice of model structures and specifications and then estimate the models utilizing a unique US nationwide dataset combining the 2009 US National Household Travel Survey (NHTS), EPA’...

Read more
Event Date:
Content Type: News Item

Six students in the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) Student Chapter of the Oregon Institute of Technology had an in-person meeting earlier this month with Congressman Greg Walden, Representative of the 2nd District of Oregon.

The students, along with Faculty Advisor Dr. Roger Lindgren, were in Washington DC attending the 2017 Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting. Funding for the student travel was provided by NITC.

Students Andrew Wixon, Alex Antonaras, Ryan Kelly, Kevin Baker, Jason Millar and Jordan Preston had the opportunity for a brief conversation with the congressman as part of their TRB experience. Students at Oregon Tech have a strong tradition of participating in NITC projects and events.

Oregon Tech has partnered with the university transportation center at Portland State since its 2006 inception as OTREC, and continues this collaboration by being a part of the expanded NITC program grant established in 2016.

The ITE student chapter at Oregon Tech, since its establishment in 2002, has provided its student members with a variety of transportation learning activities including field tours, webinars, traffic bowl participation and travel to conferences.

One of the group's main priorities is putting engineering students in contact with practicing engineers and real-world...

Read more
Event Date:
Content Type: News Item

Proponents of advanced bikeways will point out a growing body of research on these facilities’ safety and benefits for cycling. They can now add another benefit: higher home values.

Research led by Jenny Liu of Portland State University looked at property around advanced bikeways in Portland, defined as bicycle boulevards, protected bike lanes and buffered bike lanes. She found positive effects on property values close to one of these bikeways and an even stronger effect where the network was denser.

Liu presents her research Wednesday at the annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board in Washington, D.C. Learn more or download the research paper.

For single family home sales, being a quarter mile closer to an advanced bikeway translated to a $686 premium, while increasing the density by a quarter mile represented a $4,039 premium. For multi-family homes, the effect of being close to a bikeway wasn’t statistically significant on sale price, but increasing the density of bikeways translated to $4,712 of value.

The research can inform policymakers who may question how much residents value bikeways and provide insight into siting decisions. “My results don’t...

Read more
Event Date:
Content Type: News Item

Saddling transit-oriented developments with parking requirements better suited to typical suburban developments can make housing and office space near transit scarce and overly expensive. That’s one implication of a NITC research report examining driving and parking at these centers.

It makes sense that transit-oriented developments—dense, walkable centers close to transit that combine residential, commercial and office uses—would generate fewer car trips and need less parking than other development types. But until now, no one has found out how much less parking.

NITC researcher Reid Ewing of the University of Utah took up the challenge and reveals the answer in a report: a lot less. The developments Ewing’s team studied generally generated less than half the driving, and required fewer than half the parking spaces, than standard guidebooks predict. They presented some of their findings Jan. 10 during the annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board in Washington, D.C. Learn more about the conference or download the paper.

Ewing’s team studied transit-oriented developments in five United States metropolitan areas and found the...

Read more
Event Date:
Content Type: News Item

Read more of our TRB 2017 coverage here.

Tara Goddard, a doctoral candidate in the Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning at Portland State University, has been selected as the 2016 NITC university transportation center student of the year.

NITC takes pride in the development of tomorrow’s transportation leaders, involving students in research and supporting student transportation groups.

Goddard is the 11th student of the year since Portland State established its university transportation center in 2006. She is being recognized at the Council of University Transportation Centers 2017 Annual Awards Banquet in Washington, D.C., where she's also attending the Transportation Research Board annual meeting.

Goddard’s dissertation research explores drivers’ attitudes and behaviors toward bicyclists. This reflects her broader interest in the intersectionality between transportation and the social sciences, and how professionals in both disciplines can work together to improve upon public spaces and the ways that people interact within them.

This research focus comes with exciting opportunities for future work, a future which is still being determined: Goddard has applied for academic positions in different parts of the world and is waiting to...

Read more
Event Date:
Content Type: News Item

The final report on this research is available now: Design for an Aging Population

Published in April 2017, this study sought to increase understanding of the obstacles faced by people with impairments in vision, hearing and/or mobility, which are common issues for older people, and generate physical product solutions.

The research shows that aging riders face conceptual, physical and social barriers that impact their willingness to use buses. Using the bus was seen as inconvenient, time consuming, physically draining and potentially frustrating. Priority seating areas designated for older and disabled users fill quickly. People with mobility challenges may use bulky walkers and require the availability of grab bars, and users of wheeled mobility devices need different device security. Several situations noted in the study show that physically challenged riders are subject to awkward, uncomfortable social dynamics more than other bus users. Innovation in easy access seats and secure WhMD stations at the front of the bus are critical for older users, as it makes riding the bus less draining and more safe.

This research was presented at TRB's 2017 annual meeting. See below for our coverage of the research at TRB.


Seniors make up a...

Read more

Pages