Event Date:
Dec 19, 2017
Content Type: Professional Development Event



WEBINAR SUMMARY

This project builds on the success of NITC’s first Pooled Fund project that created the first national bicycle and pedestrian traffic count archive, named Bike-Ped Portal. The next step for Bike-Ped Portal is to improve its usability for both data providers and data users, specifically transportation professionals. To improve usability, area transportation planners will be invited to participate in an idea gathering session to help design an “Explore Data Page.” The purpose of this page is to allow transportation planners (data users) ready access to the non-motorized count data available in Bike-Ped Portal in a way that is useful and attractive to them. The page may include graphical displays (maps, graphs, etc.) and/or summary statistics. The work also includes other usability improvements including data quality communication improvements, user interface improvements for data providers, maintenance, adding data to the archive, software testing, spreading the word to potential data users, and inclusion of National Bicycle and Pedestrian Documentation Project (NBPDP) data....

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Event Date:
Nov 09, 2017
Content Type: Professional Development Event

 

WEBINAR SUMMARY

Traditionally the discussion about affordability has focused on housing, but HUD’s Location Affordability Index (LAI), released in 2012, helped to elevate the conversation by expanding the focus to include households’ transportation costs. In the first part of this webinar, Dr. Ganning will provide an overview of the LAI, discuss its technical limitations, and provide recommendations for future research. The second portion of the webinar will present the results of a household survey of housing and transportation costs, conducted in Cleveland, Ohio. The household survey supports and extends the conclusions of the first part of the webinar,  adding information regarding transportation cost estimates, and a perspective on the burden placed on households by unaffordable costs.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • The LAI appears to overestimate housing cost and cost burden by 10-20%, depending on tenure and urban/rural location. The transportation costs estimated by the LAI cannot be reproduced, and partially depend on data that is either not publicly available or has unacceptably large...
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Event Date:
Oct 26, 2017
Content Type: Professional Development Event


WEBINAR SUMMARY
This webinar discusses research exploring how social identity factors (race and gender) influence drivers’ behavior in interactions with pedestrians at crosswalks. One dangerous potential point of conflict for pedestrians within the transportation system is interactions with drivers at crosswalks (NHTSA, 2009), and racial minorities are disproportionately represented in pedestrian fatalities (CDC, 2013). This project examines whether racial discrimination occurs at crosswalks, which may lead to disparate crossing experiences and disproportionate safety outcomes.

Our initial research on this topic revealed predicted racial bias in drivers’ yielding behavior at crosswalks: Black male pedestrians were passed by twice as many cars as, and waited 32% longer than, White male pedestrians (Goddard, Kahn and Adkins, 2015). A new set of studies expands on these prior findings. A controlled field experiment in which Black and White male and female pedestrians crossed the street at two different types of crosswalks (unmarked vs. marked) was conducted, while trained coders marked drivers’ yielding behavior. Results...

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Event Date:
Sep 26, 2017
Content Type: Professional Development Event

WEBINAR SLIDES
Missed the presentation or want to look back at the slides? View the slides here.

WEBINAR VIDEO

WEBINAR SUMMARY
Parking is a serious issue in many urban areas, especially those experiencing rapid population growth. To address this problem, some cities have implemented demand-responsive pricing programs, where parking prices vary depending on the occupancy rate in a previous period. Yet, few empirical studies have rigorously evaluated these programs. In this study, we investigate the impacts of SFpark, a demand-responsive pricing parking program in San Francisco that began in 2011. We observe effects on three important aspects of urban transportation: parking availability, transit bus ridership and congestion. The timing of this program is plausibly exogenous to factors that affect these outcomes of interest since it is based on...

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