Webinar: Engaging Youth to Choose Car-Free Mobility

Wednesday, May 22, 2019, 10:00am to 11:00am PDT
National Institute for Transportation and Communities - 2019 Webinar with Autumn Shafer

OVERVIEW

Today’s youth are tomorrow’s riders, bikers, walkers, voters, and transportation planners. As more transit agencies begin to offer free fare passes to public middle and high school students, it is important to have good communication strategy in place to encourage transit usage so they don't miss out on the potential to affect behavior change.

Thus, transit agencies need to develop age-appropriate messaging strategies and tactics that promote youth car-free mobility. 

This webinar will present results from a NITC research project that sought to create and evaluate communication messaging that fosters more positive attitudes, intentions, and behaviors related to transit and other car-free transportation options among Portland youth. While there is no "one size fits all" approach, the Portland-based findings may yield insights that could be adapted for application in other regions.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Understand the car-free mobility-related attitudes, intentions, and behaviors of teens in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area;
  • Identify communication channels and settings that could be most effective with youth in regards to transportation system information and promotion;
  • Study the data to learn how strategic themes promoting car-free...
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Friday Transportation Seminar: Can Ridehailing Deliver Equity? Lessons for New Mobility Planning

Friday, May 31, 2019, 11:30am to 12:30pm PDT
Friday Transportation Seminar at Portland State University featuring Anne Brown of University of Oregon

Friday Transportation Seminars at Portland State University have been a tradition since 2000. With the start of 2019, we're changing it up a bit! The seminar will be delivered 11:30 am (sharp) - 12:30 pm, with additional discussion over coffee and donuts afterwards. You can also watch online.

THE TOPIC

Modes including ridehailing, bikeshare, and e-scooters offer the potential to revolutionize how people travel. But as cities and agencies work to integrate these new services into the existing transportation landscape, the equity implications of these modes remain murky.

This talk presents research on ridehail travel and equity from Los Angeles and compares the equity outcomes of ridehailing to the previous status quo embodied by taxis. The research highlights both the promise of new mobility services and the remaining obstacles to delivering equitable access. Findings yields implications for policies that cities and planners can advance to ensure that new travel modes boost mobility for all, not just some, travelers.

KEY LEARNING TAKEAWAYS

  • Ridehail...
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IBPI Faculty Workshop: Integrating Bike-Ped Topics into University Transportation Courses

Thursday, June 20, 2019, 8:00am PDT to Friday, June 21, 2019, 5:00pm PDT
IBPI Workshop at Portland State University - Integrating Bike-Ped Topics into University Transportation Courses

This summer we're hosting three workshops through our program, the Initiative for Bicycle and Pedestrian Innovation (IBPI). Learn more: Comprehensive Bikeway Design (July 15–19) and Planning for Active Transportation: If You Build It, Will They Come? (July 21–23).

COURSE OVERVIEW

Hosted every summer since 2012, this two-day course is designed to help transportation planning and engineering faculty integrate bicycle and pedestrian topics into their courses. We focus on a holistic approach to teaching transportation engineering and planning by integrating design for bicycles and pedestrians. You'll gain an understanding of state-of-the art practice as well obtain learning materials and resources to broaden your curriculum and course design.

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Friday Transportation Seminar: Challenges and Considerations for Travelers Who Have Visual Impairments: What Can You Do to Support Their Independence?

Friday, June 28, 2019, 11:30am to 12:30pm PDT
Friday Transportation Seminar at Portland State University featuring Penny Rosenblum, Department of Disability and Psychoeducational Studies, University of Arizona

Friday Transportation Seminars at Portland State University have been a tradition since 2000. With the start of 2019, we're changing it up a bit! The seminar will be delivered 11:30 am (sharp) - 12:30 pm, with additional discussion over coffee and donuts afterwards. You can also watch online.

THE TOPIC

People who have a visual impairment face some unique challenges when it comes to travel. What strategies can they use to bicycle safely? How do they orient and travel in unfamiliar communities? How does signage, lighting and other environmental characteristics affect their use of vision, hearing, and other senses during travel? What do they consider when selecting a travel option? After exploring some of these challenges, we will discuss considerations those designing and supporting travel infrastructures may reflect on so that travel options are user friendly and accessible to those with a variety of visual impairments.

KEY LEARNING TAKEAWAYS

  • Understand the unique transportation challenges faced by people who have a visual impairment;
  • Gain...
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Webinar: Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 10:00am to 11:00am PDT
NITC Webinar featuring Chris Monsere and Nathan McNeil of Portland State University

OVERVIEW

Separated bike lanes have become increasingly common around the United States as cities seek to attract the new riders, including people who want to ride but limit their riding because they do not feel comfortable riding with motor vehicle traffic. Planners and engineers are working to identify contextually appropriate, safe, and comfortable designs for intersection locations, where bicyclist paths cross the paths of turning vehicles as well as cross-traffic. This research employed a combination of user surveys and simulations to anticipate expected bicyclist and turning vehicle interactions and bicyclist comfort based on design type and volumes. Findings examine which types of intersection designs, ranging from protected intersection and bike signals to mixing zones, are most comfortable for a range of cyclists, while taking into account expected motor vehicle traffic. This project will provide valuable information to cities as they seek to include comfort-based factors into design selection criteria – an endeavor that may be essential to attracting the coveted Interested but Concerned riders.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Understand the design selection options for separated bike lanes at intersections.
  • Understand the research team’s approach to assessing the anticipated comfort of current cyclists and non-cyclists, were they to ride...
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Webinar: Aging in Place: Improving Mobility for Older Adults

Wednesday, July 24, 2019, 10:00am to 11:00am PDT

OVERVIEW

Research on older adults explores the notion of “aging in place”—providing older adults the opportunity to continue to occupy familiar surroundings, to live in their own homes and communities. But oftentimes one’s ability to stay or leave, particularly in old age, depends on the built environment. Mobility is the ability to meet the basic needs to access goods, activities, services, and social interactions as they relate to quality of life (Mollenkopf, 2005). Thus, mobility is essential to older adults due to their limited, or gradually reducing, physical and cognitive abilities.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

More information coming soon.

THE RESEARCH

This webinar is based on a study funded by the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC) and conducted at the University of Utah and Portland State University. Read more about the NITC research: Life-Space Mobility and Aging in Place.

SPEAKERS

Alan DeLaTorre, Portland State University

...

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Webinar: The Effects of Ride-hailing on Parking Demand and Revenues

Tuesday, August 6, 2019, 10:00am to 11:00am PDT
NITC Webinar featuring Anne Brown and Ben Clark of University of Oregon

OVERVIEW

For the past century, cars—and even more so, the storage of cars—have dictated urban form. With cities dedicating more space to parking than even streets and roads, parking has become baked into city land use, regulations, codes, ordinances, master plans, and even finances. So what happens when a car trip no longer ends in a parking space? Both ride-hailing (such as Uber and Lyft) and, eventually, autonomous vehicles (AVs), enable personal auto-mobility without parking. As such, these new mobility services have broad implications for parking demand and city revenues. This webinar presents findings from Seattle and the connections between ride-hailing and on-street parking demand and revenue between 2012 and 2017.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Changing patterns of ride-hail use and parking occupancy over time.
  • The association between ride-hail use and parking occupancy.
  • Implications of new transportation technologies for future parking policy.

THE RESEARCH

This webinar is based on a study funded by the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC) and conducted at the University of Oregon. Read more about the NITC research: How Will...

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Transportation & Communities Summit 2019

Thursday, September 19, 2019, 8:00am PDT to Friday, September 20, 2019, 5:00pm PDT
Transportation and Communities Summit 2019 at Portland State University

The eleventh annual Transportation & Communities Summit will be held at Portland State University on September 19–20, 2019.

Join us at the 11th annual Transportation and Communities Summit 2019 (see full schedule)! This annual event at Portland State University (PSU) in Portland, Oregon connects national mobility-focused research to local practice through breakout panel presentations, PechaKucha, posters, and networking between academics and practitioners.

The conference will center around three themes: Intersection of Transportation and Housing / Land Use; New Mobility in Active Transportation; and Multimodal Data: Collecting, Processing, Analyzing, and Using.

This year we’re excited to welcome our keynote Ben Wellington—a data scientist and policy analyst from New York, NY. The founder of I Quant NY, his data analysis has influenced local government policy including changes in NYC street infrastructure, the way New Yorkers pay for cabs and the design of NYC subway vending machines, and his talk on urban data was featured on TEDTalks. He is a contributor to The New Yorker, and a Visiting Assistant Professor in the City & Regional Planning...

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