Inequities in Urban Mobility in Portland: Understanding Community Vulnerability and Prospects for Livable Neighborhoods

Friday, May 19, 2017, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PDT

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Gentrification and development are changing the face of many Portland neighborhoods. This talk will draw on data from focus groups and participatory mapping research with residents in SE and North Portland neighborhoods. The presentation will share findings on the patterns of movement reported by residents in gentrifying neighborhoods and will offer ideas and perspectives on how to plan for a sustainable future for all Portlanders.

Amy Lubitow is an assistant professor of sociology at Portland State University. Her research interests are environmental sociology, sustainability, environmental justice, social movements, gender and environmental health. Her current projects include critical analyses of urban sustainability, particularly as they relate to bicycle infrastructure; an examination of the transit-dependent population in Portland, including the gendered implications of transit dependency; a study of the influence of scientist-activist collaboration in environmental policy realms and the...

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Network Congestion Effect of E-Hailing Transportation Services

Friday, May 12, 2017, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PDT

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E-hailing plays a key role in emerging transportation services such as ridesourcing, ridesharing and taxis, among others. This seminar will present a general economic model to analyze the congestion effect of e-hailing services in a transportation network.

The model can help analyze customers’ choices of different modes, based on their value of time and the charging schemes of different services, as well as the overall impact of the services to network level congestion.

Dr. Xuegang (Jeff) Ban is an associate professor at the civil and environmental engineering department of...

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Behavior-Based Freight Modeling at Metro

Friday, May 5, 2017, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PDT

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Chris Johnson and Bud Reiff will present on a behavior-based freight model being used at Oregon Metro. This model will replace Metro’s current truck model with a hybrid freight model that both represents multi-modal freight flows through elements of national and regional supply chains and simulates the movement of individual trucks and shipments on local networks. Model estimation and calibration will also require collection of behavioral data from shippers and receivers representing a wide range of industries, common and contract freight carriers, business that operate non-freight commercial vehicles, warehouse managers, and logistics agents.

Key project objectives:

  • Develop tools to enable a more comprehensive analysis of infrastructure needs and policy choices pertaining to the movements of goods. 
  • Develop more detailed network assignments by truck type, which support regional environmental analysis, as well as local traffic operations and engineering analysis.
  • ...
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Transport Planning in Delft, Netherlands

Friday, April 28, 2017, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PDT

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While the Netherlands is known today for the highest bicycling rates in the world, this movement only began in the 1970s. Transportation policy has been one of the critical keys to reducing automobile trips in the Netherlands.

Visiting scholar Jan Nederveen will present on transportation planning in the compact, densely populated city of Delft. Delft has been a city since 1246, and the historic street pattern is still visible today. The city has grown to 100,000 residents and covers an area of 5 square kilometers. Twenty years ago, the council decided to change the transportation philosophy from a car-oriented system to a bike city with a car-free historic center. This policy has been very successful, and bikes are now the dominant mode.

Delft found a good balance in road design for both cars and bikes. Today, the bike network has reached the point of congestion. Solutions developed for cars are being introduced in the bike network. The presentation will cover the city's transport policy, road design, the concept of a car-free city, and the challenge of reducing bicycle congestion.

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Webinar: Integrating Equity into Regional Transportation Planning

Thursday, April 27, 2017, 9:00am to 10:00am PDT

This webinar is hosted by the University of South Florida's Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR). A video recording may be available through CUTR.

This presentation will explore methods used by MPOs to understand the equity effects of regional transportation plans and investments, based on research conducted for the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC). The webinar will examine how MPOs are identifying communities of concern with regard to transportation equity, along with techniques used in evaluating accessibility to jobs and services, modal options, distributional equity of investments, and other equity considerations.

The webinar includes case studies of equity methods being applied in two distinctly different regions that participated in the research effort: 1) Hillsborough County, (Tampa) Florida: a lower density, sprawling, auto dependent area with limited public transportation; and 2) Portland, Oregon: a higher density, compact urban area with a variety of travel options and a strong urban growth management system. The two MPOs are at different stages of addressing transportation equity in their planning and public engagement activities. Transportation planners from each of these MPOs will discuss the development and application of their equity analysis methods and how attention to equity is being integrated into...

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Webinar: Economic Impacts from Bicycle and Pedestrian Street Improvements

Tuesday, April 25, 2017, 10:00am to 11:00am PDT

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As many cities are investing in street improvements to provide better biking and walking experiences, the economic value and impacts of these active transportation facilities remain areas where many practitioners, planners and policy makers are seeking more conclusive evidence. With various modes competing for scarce resources, planners and transportation agencies often struggle with how to justify infrastructure investments for non-motorized modes, particularly when driving is still the predominant mode of transportation in most cities. 

In this project we assess property value impacts of Portland’s “Green Loop” signature bike infrastructure concept, illustrating the importance of considering both accessibility and extensiveness of bike facility networks. The Green Loop is a proposed 6-mile linear open space running through the heart of Portland, connecting existing and new open spaces, parks, gathering areas, and...

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A Conceptual Framework for Understanding Latent Demand: Accounting for Unrealized Activities and Travel

Friday, April 21, 2017, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PDT

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Latent demand—the activities and travel that are desired but unrealized because of constraints—have been historically examined from the standpoint of understanding the impacts of proposed capacity or service improvements on travel demand.

Drawing on work from a variety of theoretical perspectives, this paper presents a broader conceptual view of latent demand that provides a useful framework for researching and understanding these unmet needs. This is important from an equity standpoint, as it provides insights into to questions of transport disadvantage, social exclusion and poverty.

The framework presented here is theoretical in nature and untested empirically. This study aims to promote discussion and ultimately a more developed theory that can inform transportation planning and forecasting. A better definition and quantification of latent (or induced) demand can aid transportation planners to better predict the impacts of future...

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Getting to Know the Data: Understanding assumptions, sensitivities, uncertainty, and being "conservative" while using ITE's Trip Generation Data in the Land Development Process

Friday, April 14, 2017, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PDT

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Many agencies rely on trip generation estimates to evaluate the transportation impacts of land development in urban and suburban areas alike. Over the past decade, substantial attention has been paid to one national set of guidelines—the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) Trip Generation Handbook (2014) and corresponding Manual (2012)—focusing in particular to improve the use of these data and supplementary methods for urban contexts. 

The purpose of this study is to explore the typical data provided in the Handbook, within the context of these new improved state-of-the-art methods. As ITE’s describes, “an example of poor professional judgment is to rely on rules of thumb without understanding or considering their derivation or initial context” (Institute of Transportation Engineers, 2014, p. 3). This research aims to improve the understanding of these data—still ubiquitously used across the US—to encourage increased engagement with their meaning, and following, to provide the users (e.g., engineering, planners, agencies, and...

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Urbanism Next: How technology is changing our city

Friday, April 7, 2017, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PDT

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Advances in technology such as the advent of autonomous vehicles (AV’s), the rise of E-commerce, and the proliferation of the sharing economy are having profound effects not only on how we live, move, and spend our time in cities, but also increasingly on urban form and development itself. These new technologies are changing the ease of transport, the role of transit, and the places we spend our time. These changes will have profound effects on cities including large shifts in land use, changes in street design, a potential reduction on the need for parking, a shift on where we choose to live, and challenges for urban density, the extent of sprawl, and the vitality of urban areas.

While there has been a focused effort of research on the technological aspects of autonomous vehicles and systems themselves, there has been a shortage of systematic exploration on their secondary effects on city development, form, and design, with implications for sustainability, resiliency, equity, cost...

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Webinar: Bang for the Buck? Following the Money from Transportation Decisions to Outcomes

Tuesday, March 21, 2017, 10:00am to 11:00am PDT

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Federal, state and local governments spend roughly 5 percent of their total expenditures on transportation: roads, bridges, tunnels, public transit, ports, etc. Such projects and programs are intended to support the efficient movement of people, goods and services, but also impact livability and other societal goals. The 2012 federal transportation reauthorization, MAP-21, is calling for more performance-based decision-making.

A recent research project examines transportation decision-making in six innovative states: California, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Tennessee, Utah, and Virginia.

This webinar will offer examples of current decision-making practices, note strengths and weaknesses, and highlight significant gaps in linking transportation investment decisions to outcomes.

Key takeaways include a suggested comprehensive framework for performance-based transportation decision-making and ideas for going beyond MAP-21.

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