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Content Type: News Item

Principal Investigator: Rob Zako, University of Oregon
Project Overview: Effectiveness of Transportation Funding Mechanisms for Achieving National, State, and Metropolitan Economic, Health, and Other Livability Goals
Learn more about this research by viewing the two-page Project Brief, download the toolkit, related presentations, and the full Final Report on the Project Overview page. Hear firsthand from the PI by watching the post-webinar recording here.


What do Americans get in return for their transportation investments? It’s a simple enough question on the surface, but digging for an answer yields a gnarled knot of information.

NITC investigators Rebecca Lewis and Rob Zako of the University of Oregon explored six case study states to try to get some clarity on the answer. They worked with metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) in California, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Tennessee, Utah and Virginia to examine how livability goals were embedded in...

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Event Date:
Mar 21, 2017
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Federal, state and local governments spend roughly 5 percent of their total expenditures on transportation: roads, bridges, tunnels, public transit, ports, etc. Such projects and programs are intended to support the efficient movement of people, goods and services, but also impact livability and other societal goals. The 2012 federal transportation reauthorization, MAP-21, is calling for more performance-based decision-making.

A recent research project examines transportation decision-making in six innovative states: California, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Tennessee, Utah, and Virginia.

This webinar will offer examples of current decision-making practices, note strengths and weaknesses, and highlight significant gaps in linking transportation investment decisions to outcomes.

Key takeaways include a suggested comprehensive framework for performance-based transportation decision-making and ideas for going beyond MAP-21.

...

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Event Date:
Oct 14, 2016
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Successful public transit systems increase the value of locations they serve. Capturing this location value to help fund transit is often sensible, but challenging.

This presentation will define location value capture, and synthesize lessons learned from six European and North American transit agencies that have experience with location value capture funding.

The opportunities for and barriers to implementing location value capture fall into three categories:

  • agency institutional authority,
  • agency organizational mission, and
  • public support for transit.

When any of these factors is incompatible with a location value capture strategy, implementation becomes difficult. In four of the cases studied, dramatic institutional change was critical for success. In five cases, acute crisis was a catalyst for institutional change, value capture implementation, or both. Using value capture strategies to fund transit requires practitioners to both...

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Event Date:
Nov 12, 2004
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Feb 04, 2005
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Event Date:
Apr 15, 2005
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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The 2013 Oregon Transportation Summit will take place this fall, on September 16 at Portland State University. The summit brings together transportation professionals to shape the agenda for future research, and this year's plenary speaker addresses new federal legislation which will have a direct affect on that agenda.

Adie Tomer of the Brookings Institution will deliver the remarks at the summit's morning plenary session. The topic is MAP-21, a new act which was passed by Congress in 2012. Short for "Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century," the act redistributes the scope and responsibilities of transportation departments at all levels, from municipal to federal.

"What MAP-21 essentially did is, it enhanced the evolution that's available within the federal program," Tomer said. "Because it is an overarching policy, it touches on every actor in the system in a unique way." For example, "MPOs (Metropolitan Planning Organizations) are now tasked with collecting performance measurements ... and state offices are pushed to do a little more planning when it comes to freight."

In general under the new law, "states have more authority to spend federal money in the ways they want than before," Tomer said. 
This flexibility at the state level is the answer Tomer would give to those who worry that the new act will cut funding for bikes and walking. Although there is less funding designated for bicycling and...
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