Economic and Business Outcomes of Bicycle and Pedestrian Improvements
 

PRESENTATION ARCHIVE

OVERVIEW

The National Street Improvements Study, conducted by PSU in conjunction with PeopleForBikes and consulting firm Bennett Midland, researched the economic effects of bicycle infrastructure on 14 corridors across six cities — Portland, Seattle, San Francisco, Memphis, Minneapolis and Indianapolis. The study found that improvements such as bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure had either positive or non-significant impacts on the local economy as measured through sales and employment. In this webinar, lead researcher Jenny Liu will share the results of the investigation and the unique methodology for investigating these economic outcomes.

THE RESEARCH

This webinar is based on a study funded by the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC) and the Summit Foundation, and conducted at Portland State University. Read more about the research: ...

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This event was hosted by Portland State University's Research and Strategic PartnershipsSee the schedule for the monthly Research Rounds Speaker Series here.

REVISIT THE LECTURE: VIDEO AND SLIDES

 Miss the lecture or want a look back at the presentation? Watch the video, or view the presentation slides here.


"Naturally Occurring" or "Until Market Speculation Starts": Investigating...

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The video begins at 1:20.

View slides: Foster Presentation (PDF)

View slides: Muhs Presentation (PDF)

View slides: Wagner Presentation (PDF)

Summaries:

Evaluating Driver and Pedestrian Behaviors at Enhanced Multilane Midblock Pedestrian Crossings: Case Study in Portland, Oregon This study examines driver and pedestrian behaviors at two enhanced midblock pedestrian crossings in Portland, Oregon. One crossing is on a five-lane arterial with a posted speed of 35/45 miles-per-hour (MPH) and features six rectangular rapid flash beacon (RRFB) assemblies and a narrow median refuge. The other crossing is on a suburban arterial with four travel lanes and a two-way left-turn lane. The crossing is enhanced with four RRFB assemblies and a median island with a “Z” crossing, or Danish offset, designed to encourage pedestrians to face oncoming traffic before completing the second stage of their crossing. Approximately 62 hours of video have been collected at the two locations. A total of 351 pedestrian crossings are analyzed for driver compliance (yielding) rates, pedestrian activation rates, pedestrian delay, and conflict avoidance maneuvers. The suburban arterial...

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Steve Szigethy and Jamison Kelleher, a team of graduate students in PSU's Master of Urban and Regional Planning program, will present their Planning Workshop project entitled "Imagine 82nd." The project engaged residents, businesses, property owners and students along NE 82nd Avenue in Portland to develop a comprehensive vision for the future of the corridor. Imagine 82nd deals with the portion of 82nd Avenue between the Banfield Expressway and NE Sandy Boulevard, 1.3 miles in length. This particular stretch is home to many retail and service businesses that typify the rest of 82nd Avenue, but it also includes Madison High School, a major corporate headquarters, and a 20-acre vacant brownfield site. At this seminar, Steve Szigethy and Jamison Kelleher will present the vision concepts they developed with the community, with particular emphasis on transportation and land use components.

The video begins at 5:54.

tr*NEW* LOCATION: Karl Miller Center at PSU, 631 SW Harrison St., Room 465
*NEW* REGISTRATION: Sign up through GoToWebinar

Portland State University students share the work they presented at the annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) 2018:

SEMINAR VIDEO

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View slides: Bell Presentation (PDF)

Moore Presentation (PDF)

Ma Presentation (PDF)

Summaries: 
Identification and Characterization of PM2.5 and VOC Hot Spots on Arterial Corridor by Integrating Probe Vehicle, Traffic, and Land Use Data: The purpose of this study is to explore the use of integrated probe vehicle, traffic and land use data to identify and characterize fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and volatile organic compound (VOC) hot spot locations on urban arterial corridors. An emission hot spot is defined as a fixed location along a corridor in which the mean pollutant concentrations are consistently above the 85th percentile of pollutant concentrations when considering all other locations along the corridor during the same time period. In order to collect data for this study, an electric vehicle was equipped with instruments designed to measure PM2.5 and VOC concentrations. Second-by-second measurements were performed for each pollutant from both the right and left sides of the vehicle. Detailed meteorological, traffic and land use data is also available for this research. The results of a statistical analysis are used to better understand which...

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View slides from Jennifer Dill's presentation

The video begins at 6:57.

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