Post date: Mon, 02/02/2015 - 11:48am
Event Date:
Jul 16, 2015
Content Type: Events

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Transit-oriented development (TOD) projects in low-income neighborhoods have the potential to provide needed transportation access to a segment of the population that stands to benefit significantly from these large-scale transit infrastructure projects. This research project reveals that large-scale TOD projects have the potential of leading to neighborhood revitalization and equitable outcomes in low-income Latino communities. But these positive outcomes depend on both the process and context of these particular neighborhoods, and how transportation planners incorporate the various forms of political, financial and cultural capital that exist in these communities into the planning and implementation process of TOD projects. This comparative case study analyzed the Fruitvale Transit Village in Oakland and the MacArthur Park METRO TOD in Los Angeles. We...

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Post date: Wed, 01/21/2015 - 5:06pm
Event Date:
Feb 19, 2015
Content Type: Events

For fifteen years, scholars have claimed that accessibility-based transportation planning is at the brink of becoming a new paradigm. In contrast with traditional mobility-based planning methods, which focus on the cost of transportation per mile, accessibility-based planning methods place more importance on people's ability to reach various destinations and their access to transit systems. Its use may trail behind traditional planning methods nationally, due to vague definitions, momentum of traditional performance measures, and other factors. However, this webinar argues that accessibility-based planning is demonstrably necessary in shrinking cities across the U.S., and especially among minority populations in those cities.

As shrinking cities’ need for accessibility-based planning is distinct, the challenges to accomplishing it are also distinct and rather severe. Again, this is especially true when planning for minority populations, for whom there is often a level of mistrust in the policy process itself which must be overcome. After presenting evidence of both the especial need for and the challenges inherent in accessibility-based planning in shrinking cities (and especially among minority populations), this presentation proposes potential strategies for implementation and for applying this method in those scenarios in which it is most needed.

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Post date: Wed, 01/14/2015 - 6:30pm
Event Date:
Jan 17, 2003
Content Type: Events

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Post date: Wed, 01/14/2015 - 6:04pm
Event Date:
Apr 30, 2004
Content Type: Events

The video begins at 0:51.

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Post date: Wed, 01/14/2015 - 5:48pm
Event Date:
Jan 14, 2005
Content Type: Events

The video begins at 3:25.

Post date: Wed, 01/14/2015 - 5:37pm
Event Date:
Apr 08, 2005
Content Type: Events

The video begins at 0:15.

Post date: Wed, 01/14/2015 - 5:35pm
Event Date:
Apr 01, 2005
Content Type: Events

The video begins at 3:10.

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Post date: Fri, 01/09/2015 - 6:38pm
Event Date:
Dec 02, 2005
Content Type: Events

The video begins at 2:48.

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Post date: Fri, 01/09/2015 - 6:24pm
Event Date:
Apr 14, 2006
Content Type: Events

The video begins at 9:25.

This paper, co-authored with Ian W.H. Parry, derives formulas for the welfare effects of reforming subsidies for peak and off-peak urban rail and bus fares, and applies them to the metropolitan areas of Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, and London. The model accounts for congestion, pollution, oil dependence, and accident externalities associated with automobiles and each transit mode. It also accounts for scale economies in transit supply, costs of accessing and waiting for transit service, crowding costs, pre-existing fuel taxes, and the transit agency’s adjustment of frequency, vehicle size, and route network in response to changes in demand. We find that in almost all cases existing subsidies – which typically exceed 50% of operating costs – are either about right, or possibly too low, across bus and rail, peak and off-peak period, in the three cities.

Speaker Biography: Kenneth A. Small, Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of California at Irvine, specializes in urban, transportation, and environmental economics. Recent research has concentrated on urban highway congestion, measurement of value of time and reliability, effects of fuel efficiency standards, public transit pricing, and the role of fuel taxes in managing external costs of automobiles. Prof. Small served five years as coeditor of the international journal, Urban Studies, and is now Associate...

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Post date: Thu, 01/08/2015 - 6:26pm
Event Date:
Apr 13, 2007
Content Type: Events

The video begins at 7:47.

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